What to do on fantasy football waivers to replace Dalvin Cook, Chris Carson

Two notable rookies suffered injuries on Sunday. We break down what you should consider on the fantasy football waiver wire.

Editor’s update: Vikings head coach Mike Zimmer confirmed Dalvin Cook has a torn ACL. He is done for the year.

The NFL is a rough sport, and the physicality of it took a toll in Week 4. Sunday saw rookie running backs Dalvin Cook and Chris Carson suffer what appeared to be significant leg injuries. Cook injured his knee, and after the game, head coach Mike Zimmer said the fear is it is a torn ACL. Carson suffered what appeared to be a fracture, as the Seattle Seahawks brought out an air cast before carting him off the field.

Cook’s injury will be clarified in an MRI, while Carson’s could be known quickly after an X-ray. A subsequent MRI would likely happen to check for ligament damage on the latter’s injury. Either way, you’ll know what their respective statuses are in time to make a decision for the Week 5 waiver wire.

Cooke went down after 13 carries and a reception. Latavius Murray had seven rushing attempts, while Jerick McKinnon had two rushing attempts. The Vikings signed Murray prior to drafting Cook, and there is a good chance Murray will take the majority of snaps Cook might have played prior to the injury. Murray is owned in 15 percent of Yahoo! leagues, while McKinnon is owned in 3 percent of those leagues.

Carson injured his leg in the closing minutes of the Seahawks win, after rushing 12 times for 42 yards. Eddie Lacy took over the bulk of the backfield work, finishing the game with 11 rushing attempts. Even while Carson was in the game, J.D. McKissic was emerging as an intriguing dual-use threat.

The Seahawks left Thomas Rawls a healthy scratch so it is hard to tell who of Rawls or Lacy is the back to own in standard leagues. McKissic might gain some intriguing PPR value depending on Carson’s status. Lacy is owned in 17 percent of leagues, Rawls is owned in 28 percent of leagues, and McKissic is owned in 2 percent of leagues.

Via SBNation.com